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Gallery

Discover other canadian rock art sites...

  • Photograph of various figures, an anthropomorph holding a hoop decorated with threads, seems to be performing a dance in front of a horned figure (on the right) that holds a snake in its hand.
    Sinclair Creek Site, British Columbia. On the left, an anthropomorph holding a hoop decorated with threads seems to be performing a dance in front of a horned figure (on the right) that holds a snake in its hand.

    Photo: Pictogram at Kootenay National Park, British Columbia. ©Parks Canada

  • High Rock Narrows, Saskatchewan. Image representing several paintings, including a bird with long sinuous wings, two anthropomorphs with raised arms and a circle with a cross inside.
    High Rock Narrows, Saskatchewan. Several paintings, including a bird with long sinuous wings, two anthropomorphs with raised arms and a circle with a cross inside, are part of this complex group of images.

    Photo: ©Tim Jones, Archaeologist and Heritage Resources Consultant

  • Wasawakasik Lake Site, Saskatchewan. Photograph of two zoomorphs, a Thunderbird (bottom right) and a turtle (top right); between the two, a motif that looks like a schematized bird.
    Wasawakasik Lake, Saskatchewan. Two zoomorphs: a Thunderbird (bottom right) and a turtle (top right); between the two, a motif that looks like a schematized bird.

    Photo : University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, RG2100, INS 990

  • Photograph of a rock painting at Grassi Lake, Alberta. It represents a human figure holding a circular object: a hoop, a drum or maybe a shield.
    Grassi Lake, Alberta. Rock painting of a human figure holding a circular object: a hoop, a drum or maybe a shield.

    Photo: ©Jack Brink, Archaeologist and Curator, Royal Alberta Museum

  • Missinaibi Lake cliff on which several representations, including caribous, a bear and a face, are painted.
    Fairy Point, Ontario. Several representations, including caribous, a bear and a face, are clearly visible on this cliff at Missinaibi Lake.

    Photo: ©Dagmara Zawadzka, Université du Québec à Montréal

  • Bedford Barrens in Nova Scotia. A star motif engraved on a rare site in the Maritimes, probably dating from the pre-contact period.
    Bedford Barrens, Nova Scotia. The 'Eight-Pointed Star' motif recorded at Bedford Barrens, near Halifax, Nova Scotia. The Mi'kmaq petroglyph is illuminated using the Highlight-Reflectance Transformation Imaging technique. This method reveals design detail and manufacture tool marks indiscernible under daylight conditions.

    Photo: ©Bryn Tapper, Memorial University of Newfoundland

  • Image of rock paintings at Agawa Bay that represent a canoe and underwater creatures, Mishipeshu, or Great Lynx, and snakes.
    Agawa Bay, Ontario. Rock paintings depicting a canoe and underwater creatures, Mishipeshu, or Great Lynx, and snakes.

    Photo: ©Antti Lahelma, University of Helsinki, Finland

  • Wakimika Lake, Ontario. Photograph of a rare petroglyph in the Canadian Shield depicting a moose and its antlers.
    Wakimika Lake, Ontario. One of the very few petroglyph sites of the Canadian Shield, with a male moose standing out among the carved figures.

    Photo: ©Dagmara Zawadzka, Université du Québec à Montréal

  • An image of rock art motifs at Stanley-Rapids, Saskatchewan: Bison, a stylized bird and wavy snake-like figures are part of the rich visual repertoire of this site.
    Stanley Rapids, Saskatchewan. Images of bison, a stylized bird and wavy snake-like figures are part of the rich visual repertoire of this site on the Churchill River.

    Photo: ©Tim Jones, Archaeologist and Heritage Resources Consultant

  • Nipigon River Site in Ontario. Photograph of a figure with horns representing a medicine man or a manitou.
    Nipigon River, Ontario. A horned figure (shown at the top right) in a crouching position representing a Manitou or a medicine man.

    Photo: ©Daniel Arsenault, Université du Québec à Montréal

  • Photograph of the Herschel Monolith whose surface has many more or less deep cavities.
    Herschel Monolith, Saskatchewan. A glacial erratic whose surface has many more or less deep cupules (circular depressions).

    Photo : MaryLou Driedger

  • Photograph of a painted motif, possibly a sturgeon, at the Rocher à l’Oiseau site in Québec.
    Rocher à l’Oiseau, Quebec. Fish motif (sturgeon?) that appears on one of the 77 painted panels at the Rocher à l'Oiseau site in Outaouais, Québec.

    Photo: ©Dagmara Zawadzka, Université du Québec à Montréal

  • McGowan Lake, Nova Scotia. Carving of a hunting scene where a Mi'gmaq man, smoking a pipe and wearing a hat, sends two dogs to hunt moose.
    McGowan Lake, Nova Scotia. Carving of a hunting scene where a Mi'gmaq man, smoking a pipe and wearing a hat, sends two dogs to hunt moose.

    Photo: ©Brian Leigh Molyneaux, PhD

  • Ribstones near Viking in Alberta. Engraved lines evoke the spine and ribs of a bison.
    Ribstones near Viking, Alberta. Rocks that evoke bison’s spine and ribs.

    Photo: ©Jack Steinbring, Ripon College

  • Photograph of a Thunderbird depicted at Reindeer Lake in Saskatchewan.
    Reindeer Lake, Saskatchewan. A lichenoglyph of a Thunderbird depicted on a rock.

    Photo: University of Saskatchewan, University Archives & Special Collections, RG2100, INS S2-1030

  • Rock painting at Pictured Lake in Ontario. It represents a remarkable canoe with eight occupants, two of whom hold paddles.
    Pictured Lake, Ontario. This remarkable rock painting of a canoe with eight occupants, two of which hold paddles, served as a logo for the Canadian Rock Art Research Associates (CRARA) that promulgated the research and conservation of Canadian rock art.

    Photo: ©Private Collection

  • Paimusk Creek site in Manitoba. Several rock paintings are found at this place, including a caribou or a moose, a canoe with three occupants, a Thunderbird, as well as more or less complex geometric motifs.
    Paimusk Creek, Manitoba. Several vivid rock paintings are part of this detailed panel, including a caribou or a moose, a canoe with three occupants, a Thunderbird, as well as more or less complex geometric motifs.

    Photo: ©Jack Steinbring, Ripon College

  • Mystic Cave, Alberta. Representation of what might be a squatting square-bodied anthropomorph and feathered staffs.
    Mystic Cave, Alberta. Representation of what might be a squatting square-bodied anthropomorph and feathered staffs.

    Photo: ©Jack Brink, Archaeologist and Curator, Royal Alberta Museum

  • Painted panel at the Bloodvein River site in Ontario. This site has many images, including an anthropomorph holding a smaller being, canoes and handprints.
    Bloodvein River, Ontario. This site located between Lakes Murdock and Larus contains several images, including an anthropomorph that holds in its hand a smaller being, canoes and handprints.

    Photo: Peter Albinger

  • Mikinak site in Québec. Rock paintings on Lake Wapizagonke representing a triangle and a turtle.
    Mikinak, Quebec. Rock paintings on Lake Wapizagonke, Québec, representing a triangle and a turtle.

    Photo: ©Daniel Arsenault, Université du Québec à Montréal

  • McGowan Lake, Nova Scotia. Petroglyphs depicting a woman riding a moose turned into a horse, a ship and several human figures dressed in 19th century Mi'gmaq clothing.
    McGowan Lake, Nova Scotia. This rich palimpsest of images includes a woman riding a moose turned into a horse, a ship, and several human figures dressed in 19th century Mi'gmaq clothing.

    Photo: ©Brian Leigh Molyneaux, PhD

  • Rock paintings at Artery Lake in Ontario. They represent, among others, a medicine man with a bag, a canoe and a buffalo.
    Artery Lake, Ontario. Rock paintings depicting, among others, a medicine man with a bag, a canoe and a bison.

    Photo: Peter Albinger

  • Rock carvings located in the Petroglyph Provincial Park, near the city of Nanaimo, British Columbia. Hybrid beings are represented, reminiscent of those at the K'aka'win site.
    Nanaimo, British Columbia. Located in the Petroglyph Provincial Park, near the city of Nanaimo, these carvings represent hybrids reminiscent of the K'aka'win site.

    Photo: Chris Cheadle / Alamy Stock Photo